NHS Lincolnshire is responsible for improving health and health services for the people of Lincolnshire.
"NHS Lincolnshire is at the heart of your local NHS. We are responsible for commissioning (planning and buying) healthcare for approximately 740,000 people
across Lincolnshire."

 


NHS TRUST BOARD MEETING - OCTOBER 28

The next Board meeting for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will take place on Tuesday, October 28.
The monthly meeting will start at 1pm in the Royal Oak Boardroom at the trust's headquarters at Bridge House, The Point, Sleaford, NG34 8GG.

Items due to be discussed this month include updates on the staff friends and family test, finance and performance and the trust's quality account.

Dr Don White, Chairman of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: "Our monthly Board meetings provide the public with an opportunity to find out more about the organisation, the services we provide and how well we are performing. The public are very welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."

LCHS runs services across the whole of Lincolnshire with district nurses, specialist nurses and teams of therapists working to keep people out of hospital or get them home sooner. Four community  hospitals also provide services in the heart of Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth.
Infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams work in the community to keep children healthy.
Out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre, Peterborough Minor Illness and Injury Unit, and five community practices provide primary healthcare to patients.
LCHS also has the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.


SOUTH LINCOLNSHIRE CLINICAL COMMISSIONING GROUP SUPPORT GLOBAL HAND WASHING DAY

To mark Global Handwashing Day on October 15, South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group is reminding people of the importance of regularly washing your hands and making it part of your daily routine for good hygiene.

Washing your hands is something so simple, yet it is a habit that many people forget to do. Hands are one of the biggest spreaders of germs though and washing your hands on a regular basis with soap and warm water can help to prevent the spread of flu, stomach bugs and other winter illnesses. 

This not only protects yourself, but those around you by removing any infection-causing germs from your hands.

The theme for Global Handwashing Day this year is focused on ‘Choose handwashing, Choose health’. This is to emphasise the need for people to live healthier lives by implementing the habit of washing their hands with soap and water into their daily routines.

Every year, around 200 million people from over 100 different countries take part in Global Handwashing Day.

Dr Miles Langdon, Chair of NHS South Lincolnshire CCG, said:

“For something as simple as washing your hands, it’s important to raise awareness to help prevent the spread of germs and reduce your chances of getting ill, especially amongst young children.

“This is particularly important after going to the bathroom or before you handle any food, as it helps to reduce the spread of germs which can increase the spread of flu, as well as diarrhoeal and acute respiratory infections.”


PROTECT YOURSELF AND YOUR BABY FROM FLU

Mother's would do anything to protect your unborn baby, but many pregnant women don’t realise how dangerous flu can be.
Getting vaccinated against flu is the best way to protect yourself and your baby from the virus, and make sure you stay flu safe all winter.
If you’re pregnant the flu jab is quick, safe and completely free. You can have the jab at any stage of pregnancy, and it can also protect your baby for the first few months after birth.
The uptake of the vaccination remains low amongst pregnant women in Lincolnshire despite the increased risks they face by catching the virus.

Dr Miles Langdon, Chair of NHS South Lincolnshire CCG, said:
“Pregnant women are at increased risk of serious illness if they catch flu. In fact, studies have shown that pregnant women with some strains of flu are four times more likely to develop serious illness and four to five times more likely to be admitted to hospital than the general population.”
It normally takes up to two weeks to develop protection after the vaccine, and protection against flu lasts all winter. Pregnant women are urged to get a jab as soon as possible to minimise the risk to themselves and their babies.
The flu vaccine only lasts for a year, so if you had a jab last year or during a previous pregnancy, you will need another one to stay flu safe. The jab doesn’t contain the ‘live’ virus so it cannot give you the flu.
Flu is an unpleasant illness which can result in a stay in hospital. In severe cases flu can be a killer. Don’t take the risk – speak to your midwife or GP today to make sure you have a happy and healthy pregnancy by getting the jab and getting flu safe.

For more information, speak to your GP, midwife or local pharmacist or visit http://www.nhs.uk/flu


NEW APPOINTMENT TO PETERBOROUGH AND STAMFORD HOSPITAL

Dr Miles Langdon, Chair of the Governing Body for South Lincolnshire CCG has been successfully appointed to the role of Clinical Director for Medicine and Emergency Care at Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – a post he will be taking up in December 2014.

This new position will be part-time and will take up half of his working week. This will mean he will step down from the role as Chair of the Governing Body for the CCG.  He will continue with his general practice in the St Mary’s Surgery in Stamford.

Gary Thompson, Chief Officer for South Lincolnshire CCG said:

“This is an excellent opportunity for Miles and we wish him every success in this new role with Peterborough Hospital.  We will be sorry to lose Miles from the Governing Body as he has been instrumental in the success of the CCG during its first year in existence.  His clinical leadership and strength of character has ensured that we are at the fore front of clinical commissioning in Lincolnshire.”

Dr Miles Langdon added:

“It has been a challenging first year for the CCG but as a team we have all worked together to ensure it has been successful.  Working at Peterborough Hospital will mean that I am still involved with the workings of the CCG as they are the major acute provider for South Lincolnshire.  Obviously I will be sorry to give up the role as Chair of the Governing Body but am sure that my successor will be as well supported as I have been.”

Stephen Graves, Chief Executive at Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: 

“We look forward to welcoming Miles in December. His leadership skills and vast experience as a GP means he brings some excellent skills and insight into the running of our emergency and medical services. We have lots to do to enhance patient experience in this area and we are looking forward to working with him.”
STAFF AND VOLUNTEER SUCCESSES CELEBRATED AT AWARDS CEREMONY
 

Dedication, commitment and service above and beyond the call of duty was honoured at Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust's annual Celebrating Success Awards.
The awards formed part of a special Health at Home event on Wednesday, where the public were invited to find out more about LCHS and the services it provides.
The occasion was also an opportunity for the trust to show its thanks and appreciation to teams and individuals who were nominated for awards by their colleagues across nine categories. An overall winner was also selected by LCHS Chief Executive Andrew Morgan.
Paralympic skier Jade Etherington opened the event and joined trust Chairman Dr Don White to present the awards. Councillor Christine Talbot, Chairman of the Health Scrutiny Committee for Lincolnshire, also presented awards to the finalists in the Outstanding Volunteer of the Year category.
Visitors could also see a showcase of LCHS services from across Lincolnshire and Peterborough and the afternoon concluded with the trust's annual public meeting.
The Celebrating Success winners are:


Outstanding Patient Involvement Award - Victoria Wilson (Outpatients Department, Skegness Hospital)
Outstanding Innovation Award - Mandy Street, Julie Cantwell, Joanne Dalton, Kelly Waldie (breastfeeding website team, countywide)
Celebrating Equality and Diversity Award - Andrew Bohlman (Clinical Systems Trainer, countywide)
Time 2 Care Award - Valerie Ronis (Clinical Education, countywide)
Behind the Scenes Award - Carolyn Barlow and Vicky Mitchell (Bridge House, Sleaford)
Outstanding Leadership Award - Kim Barr (Matron, Johnson Community Hospital, Spalding)
Outstanding Team of the Year - Children's Speech and Language Therapy Assistants, countywide)
Outstanding Volunteer of the Year Award - Joint winners - Betty Archer and Alyce Taylor (County Hospital, Louth) and Barbara Finch (Skegness Hospital)
Chairman's Award - 'Unsung Hero' - Karen Lawrie (Children's Speech and Language Therapy, South Lincolnshire)
Chief Executive's Award - Valerie Ronis (Clinical Education, countywide)

LCHS Chief Executive Andrew Morgan said: "We are very proud of the services we offer in Lincolnshire and Peterborough, and this year wanted to share our successes with the communities we serve. We had more than 150 nominations in total for our Celebrating Success Awards and I would like to congratulate each of our winners and finalists. They all make significant contributions to supporting our patients and their families on a daily basis and their selfless dedication is what helps to make LCHS so special. I would also like to thank Jade Etherington for sharing the story of her successes with us, Councillor Talbot for helping to present one of our awards and Melvyn Prior for compering the afternoon."
Get the flu jab, be flu safe!

NHS South Lincolnshire CCG is urging those most at risk from flu to protect themselves and their families as a matter of priority with a free flu jab. Full protection from the vaccine takes up to two weeks to develop and can help prevent vulnerable patients from further health complications associated with influenza such as pneumonia.
Those most at risk include pregnant women, people living with a health condition such as severe asthma, chest or heart complaints, and those aged 65 and over.
Throughout autumn and winter, critical care units across the region become busy with people who should have been vaccinated against flu, most of these patients would have been eligible for a free flu jab on the NHS. 
Dr. Miles Langdon, NHS South Lincolnshire CCG
“Influenza can be a very serious illness, even for those who are fit- and for the elderly and ill could even be fatal. There are still people who are not aware of the flu jab, if you think you may be at risk, we urge you to seek information and advice from your GP practice.
I would strongly advise you to contact your surgery to arrange for your flu jab, and remember this is a preventable illness. Contact your GP surgery now to arrange a convenient appointment and get your jab. It’s quick, safe and free for those most at risk from the virus.”
For more information, speak to your GP or local pharmacist, or visit www.nhs.uk/flu.
Flu vaccinations are currently offered free of charge to the following ‘at risk’ groups:
• People aged 65 years and over (including those becoming 65 years of age by 31st March 2015)
• All pregnant women (including those women who become pregnant during the flu season).
• Children aged 2-3, who are eligible for a free nasal flu vaccination
• People with a serious medical condition such as
i. Chronic (long-term) respiratory disease, such as severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchitis
ii. Chronic heart disease, such as heart failure
iii. Chronic kidney disease at stage 3, 4 or 5
iv. Chronic liver disease
v. Chronic neurological disease, such as Parkinson's disease or motor neurone disease
vi. Diabetes
vii. A weakened immune system due to disease (such as HIV/AIDS) or treatment (such as cancer treatment)
• People living in long stay residential care homes or other long-stay care facilities where rapid spread is likely to follow introduction of infection and cause high morbidity and mortality. This does not include, for instance, prisons, young offender institutions, or university halls of residence
• People who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or those who are the main carer of an older or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill
Free blood pressure tests for patients in Lincolnshire

Patients in South Lincolnshire are being offered free blood pressure checks as part of Know Your Numbers Week from 15th-21st September. South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is urging patients to know their numbers by visiting www.bloodpressureuk.org to find their nearest pressure station.
Blood Pressure UK has over 1,000 'Pressure Stations' across the UK offering free blood pressure checks. More than eight million people in the UK have high blood pressure but are not being treated for it.
The tests, which help patients review whether their blood pressure count is within a normal, high or low range, can play a significant role in reducing harm caused by heart attacks, strokes and other serious health complications resulting from high or low blood pressure.
The checks will be undertaken by fully- qualified staff, with vital follow-up guidance given as necessary. Resources and tips from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) on how to keep your heart healthy by reducing your blood cholesterol, changing diet, keeping active, reducing salt intake and maintaining a healthy weight will also be available.
High blood pressure can cause heart attacks, strokes and other serious health problems.
Dr Miles Langdon, Chair of NHS South Lincolnshire CCG, said:
“Knowing your blood pressure numbers really does count so we’d urge everyone to get their blood pressure levels tested during Know Your Numbers Week.
“An alarming 30% of people in the UK are affected by high blood pressure but most of the time they will not know it. Yet it’s responsible for causing very serious illnesses including heart attacks, which can be fatal.
Having a blood pressure test can also help people to find out whether they have low blood pressure.  In general low blood pressure is good news, but in some cases it might be triggered by medicines or a long-term illness such as diabetes.”
Preventing Pressure Sores

South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group is raising awareness of the signs of, and how patients, their carers and families can help avoid, pressure ulcers. It is estimated that just under half a million people in the UK will develop at least one pressure ulcer in any given year. This is usually people with an underlying health condition. For example, around one in 20 people who are admitted to hospital with a sudden illness will develop a pressure ulcer. People over 70 years old are particularly vulnerable to pressure ulcers as they are more likely to have mobility problems and ageing of the skin.
Pressure ulcers are mostly avoidable and the signs to look out for include the skin looking red or discoloured, discomfort, blistering and skin damage. They can develop when a large amount of pressure is applied to an area of skin over a short period of time. They can also occur when less pressure is applied over a longer period of time. The areas on the body usually affected include the shoulders or shoulder blades, elbows, the back of the head and the buttock area. 
For some people, pressure ulcers are an inconvenience that requires minor nursing care. For others, they can be serious and lead to life-threatening complications, such as blood poisoning or gangrene. Making regular and frequent changes to the position of the patient is one of the most effective ways of preventing pressure ulcers.  If the pressure ulcer has developed then changing position will avoid putting further pressure on the area and give the wound the best chance of healing.

Dr Miles Langdon, Chief Clinical Officer of South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group, said:

“Research shows that over 90% of pressure ulcers are avoidable and that treatment costs the NHS over £2billion a year.  We are committed to working across the health community to prevent the reduction of pressure sores.  If you see any difference in your own skin or that of a patient or family member please tell your health visitor, district nurse or contact your GP to have it treated as quickly as possible”

Pressure ulcers are graded from one to four:

Grade one
A grade one pressure ulcer is the most superficial type of ulcer. The affected area of skin appears discoloured. Grade one pressure ulcers do not turn white when pressure is placed on them. The skin remains intact but it may hurt or itch. It may also feel either warm and spongy, or hard.

Grade two
In grade two pressure ulcers, some of the outer surface of the skin or the deeper layer of skin is damaged, leading to skin loss. The ulcer looks like an open wound or a blister.

Grade three
In grade three pressure ulcers, skin loss occurs throughout the entire thickness of the skin. The underlying tissue is also damaged. However, the underlying muscle and bone are not damaged. The ulcer appears as a deep, cavity-like wound.

Grade four
A grade four pressure ulcer is the most severe type of pressure ulcer. The skin is severely damaged and the surrounding tissue begins to die (tissue necrosis). The underlying muscles or bone may also be damaged.

People with grade four pressure ulcers have a high risk of developing a life-threatening infection.
SUCCESSES AND FUTURE PLANS SHOWCASED AT ANNUAL CELEBRATION EVENT
 

Lincolnshire and Peterborough's residents are being invited to help celebrate the work of the area's NHS community teams at a special Health at Home event.
For the first time, Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will be combining its annual staff awards ceremony with its Annual Public Meeting on September 24 at The Showroom on Tritton Road, Lincoln.Health at Home will be open to the public to allow patients, their families and carers, and the wider community the opportunity to see first hand some of the amazing work the trust's staff do on a daily basis across Lincolnshire and Peterborough.
From 12pm, visitors will be able to enjoy a light lunch and browse a selection of stands representing the trust's services.
Britain's most successful female winter Paralympian, Jade Etherington, will open the awards ceremony at 1.30pm, while BBC Radio Lincolnshire's Melvyn Prior will compere the afternoon. A showcase of some of the trust's services, including how it supports care from the cradle to the grave, will follow the awards ceremony before the annual public meeting begins at 6pm.
LCHS Chief Executive Andrew Morgan said: "We are very proud of the services we offer across the whole of our area and it's a pleasure to be able to share our celebrations with the community. By including our annual public meeting in Health at Home, we would also like to take the opportunity to talk about our plans to bring care closer to patients' homes, and hear from those who use our services about their own experiences."
Anyone who would like to attend the afternoon is asked to confirm their attendance by calling 01529 220300 or emailing membership@lincs-chs.nhs.uk by Monday, September 15.
Schools out, stay active

As kids across the country wake up to yet another wonderful day of summer, parents grow anxious at the prospect of entertaining and funding 6 weeks’ worth of fun-filled family time. Mums and dads across Lincolnshire will be pleased to hear there are numerous cost effective summer solutions right at their fingertips, to keep the little ones busy indoors or out. First, visit the Change4Life website: (http://www.nhs.uk/Change4Life/Pages/local-change-for-life-activities.aspx ), enter your postcode, select whether it’s an indoor or outdoor activity you’d like  and the number of children involved, and a range of local activities will appear to choose from. Warm summer days provide the perfect opportunity to get out and about more, improving your physical and mental wellbeing. Make the most of our picturesque countryside and spend the afternoon exploring the Lincolnshire Wolds or our stunning coastline - visit www.walkinginlincs.co.uk to download an explorer map, pack a picnic, remembering your 5-a-day and healthy, energy-boosting snacks, and make a day of it! The Change4Life website has some great recipes for lunchboxes and picnics (http://www.nhs.uk/Change4Life/Pages/healthy-lunchbox-picnic.aspx ) Your local council will also be organising sports clubs, theatre groups and various other events as part of a ‘Summer What’s On Guide’, which will be available online in the coming weeks, so keep an eye on their website for swimming offers and other local attraction discounts that the council often promote during the holiday period. Dr Miles Langdon NHS South Lincolnshire CCG said: “Don’t forget, the sun is at its strongest between 11am and 3pm, so if your child is outdoors during this time, make sure they are covered in a high factor sun cream containing UVA and UVB protection, (even in overcast conditions) and reapply regularly throughout the day- use a waterproof lotion if you are visiting an outdoor swimming pool. Try to encourage them to wear a hat and keep hydrated- particularly if they are taking part in sporting activities.” The Family Information Service can also help families who need formal childcare over the summer or other children’s services and activities. For further details and advice, contact the Family Information Service on Freephone 0800 195 1635, Monday to Friday, 8am to 6pm, or via email at fis@lincolnshire.gov.uk
BUTTERFLY HOSPICE TO OPEN TO PATIENTS THIS MONTH

The Butterfly Hospice in Boston will be officially open to patients from next week.
The hospice's six-bed inpatient unit will welcome its first patients on Monday, August 11.
Working in partnership, Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) and the Butterfly Hospice Trust, will provide palliative, end of life and respite care in an informal and clinically-based environment for adults with life-limiting illness.
LCHS Matron Natalie McKee said: "The team at the Butterfly Hospice are very excited to be welcoming their first patients. We have been working hard over the last few months and have an experienced team of clinical staff ready to introduce this innovative service into our community. Our partnership with the Butterfly Hospice Trust allows us to use our nursing expertise to complement existing services in the community to ensure our patients experience seamless, excellent care." Butterfly Hospice Trust Chief Executive Judi Byrne said: "For the first time, local people and families will have access and choice to palliative care close to their home. We know this means so much to so many people and we are delighted to be welcoming our first patients. Our staff and volunteer team are looking forward to working with the clinical team to provide the care people need." Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) is Lincolnshire’s largest provider of community healthcare. The trust’s 2,300 staff care for thousands of patients every day at home or their chosen place of care, in community hospitals, health clinics, minor injuries units and walk in centre. Health visitors and school nurses support young families, while teams of nurses, therapists and specialists provide care for those across the county, whether suffering from respiratory conditions, heart problems, diabetes, cancer, or wounds such as leg ulcers. LCHS also provides primary care out of hours and healthy lifestyle services.
The Butterfly Hospice Trust is an independent charity in Lincolnshire set up to provide free palliative and end of life care to anyone over the age of 18 who has been diagnosed with a life-limiting illness. Its purpose-built hospice sits within four acres of grounds close to Pilgrim Hospital in Boston to provide inpatient facilities, including symptom control, respite and end of life care. The trust’s work is supported by the generosity of the local community and businesses.
For enquiries, contact:
- LCHS - Communications on 01529 220407
- Butterfly Hospice Trust – Sandra White – 01205 311222
TREE PLANTING TO COMMEMORATE HOSPITAL'S WARTIME HERITAGE
 

Hospital care given to wounded servicemen in Gainsborough during the First World War will be remembered 100 years on with a special commemorative service. Guests will gather at John Coupland Hospital at 11am on Monday, August 4, when a tree will be planted to mark the centenary of the war. The hospital had been open for less than a year when it became a military hospital to support returning injured servicemen in 1914. After the war, an extension known as the Peace Memorial was built as a permanent memorial to those who had died. It opened in September 1921 and included an outpatients department on the ground floor and a nurses' home above. The dedication service, led by the Rev Bill Williams, will include the installation of a memorial plaque and wreath laying. The tree will be planted by ex-servicemen and John Coupland Hospital Charities Committee members David Lomas and Derek Hall. A time capsule will be buried at a later date when details of the centenary celebrations have been collected. The event has been organised by the John Coupland Hospital Charities Committee.
Brenda Allen, Chairman of the Charities Committee, said: "The tree planting started out as a simple event, suggested at committee, to mark the work of the hospital during the Great War. It has since taken on a life of its own and expanded to become another important event in the hospital's history, simply because of the interest and love for it in the area. We hope the tree will engender more community interest in our local hospital." Services at the hospital today are run by Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust. Chief Executive Andrew Morgan said: "It is testament to the hard work and dedication of all who have been involved with the hospital, both past and present, that it still remains a well-loved part of the community today. We are honoured to be able to remember the role the hospital and its staff played during the First World War."
NHS TRUST BOARD MEETING - JULY 29
 

The next Board meeting for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will take place on Tuesday, July 29.
The monthly meeting will start at 1pm in the Royal Oak Boardroom at the trust's headquarters at Bridge House, The Point, Sleaford, NG34 8GG.
Items due to be discussed this month include an update on the Friends and Family Test for both patients and staff, and a proposal for the trust to support the Sign up to Safety campaign. The Board will also receive updates on finances and performance.
Dr Don White, Chairman of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: "Our monthly Board meetings provide the public with an opportunity to find out more about the organisation, the services we provide and how well we are performing. The public are very welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."
LCHS runs services at four community hospitals in Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth, while specialist nurses and teams of therapists work to keep people out of hospital, or get them home sooner.
Infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams work in the community to keep children healthy.
Out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre, Peterborough Minor Illness and Injury Unit, and five community practices provide primary healthcare to patients.
LCHS also has the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.
TWO MORE QUEEN'S NURSES FOR SKEGNESS TEAM
 The community nursing team in Skegness can now boast three Queen's Nurses amongst its staff.
Nurses Kayte Willis and Katrina Merifield, who work for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), have both been successful in being awarded the Queen's Nurse title by the community nursing charity The Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI).
The accolade allows them to follow in the footsteps of their team leader, Tracy Means, who has held the title since 2012.
The title is not an award for past service, but indicates a continued commitment to the delivery of high standards of patient care, learning and leadership. Nurses who hold the title benefit from developmental workshops, bursaries, networking opportunities, and a shared professional identity.
Case Manager Kayte qualified as a nurse in 2007 and started her career in a minor injuries unit before moving to intensive care. She later moved into the community and has spent the last two years as a case manager. 
She said: "Becoming a Queen's Nurse has meant a great deal to me as this was not only a nomination from my manager, Tracy, but also, and most importantly, from my patients, as they truly believed in the difference I made their lives. As a Queen's Nurse I will endeavour to deliver high quality care to my patients and encourage other community nurses within the team to become involved in the institute and learn from the qualities it encourages us to have."
Staff Nurse Katrina started her career as a health care support worker in 1998 and qualified as a nurse in 2009. Since then, she has worked within the community nursing team. 
She said: "I wanted to become a Queen's Nurse to continue demonstrating my constant compassion, dedication and commitment to high standards of patient care. I hope to be able to extend my skills, not just within patient care but for the next generation of nurses' development. I will continue to hold my head high and be proud to work with community services."
Sue Cousland, Chief Nurse and Director of Operations at LCHS, said: "Congratulations to both Kayte and Katrina. We are very proud to say we have so many Queen's Nurses working with us at LCHS, particularly in Skegness. To have three in one team is testament to the dedication and commitment they give to their patients. Our Queen's Nurses also play an important role in helping us to continue in the development our services. Currently this includes developing a model to provide educational support into care homes, and working on a formula which will ensure the team are able to safely manage the increasingly complex needs of the patients in the community."
NHS TRUST BOARD MEETING - JUNE 24
 

The next Board meeting for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will take place on Tuesday, June 24.
The monthly meeting will start at 1pm in the Royal Oak Boardroom at the trust's headquarters at Bridge House, The Point, Sleaford, NG34 8GG.
Items due to be discussed this month include an update on staffing establishments and the trust's annual accounts.
Dr Don White, Chairman of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: "Our monthly Board meetings provide the public with an opportunity to find out more about the organisation, the services we provide and how well we are performing. The public are very welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."
LCHS runs services at four community hospitals in Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth, while specialist nurses and teams of therapists work to keep people out of hospital, or get them home sooner.
Infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams work in the community to keep children healthy.
Out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre, Peterborough Minor Illness and Injury Unit, and five community practices provide primary healthcare to patients.
LCHS also has the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.

LAST CHANCE FOR TICKETS FOR HOSPITAL BALL
 

The final few tickets are up for grabs for the sixth annual Johnson Community Hospital Ball.
The event, which has helped to raise more than £10,000 for charity, will take place on July 12 at Springfields Events Centre in Spalding.
This year, the event follows a 'Best of British' theme, with a three-course dinner and entertainment by Mind The Gap. A disco and a grand prize draw will also feature as part of the fun, along with an auction where a wide selection of items will be up for grabs.
Donations for the auction are very welcome and can be made by contacting any member of the ball committee via either the hospital switchboard on 01775 652000 or by the ball website below.
Proceeds from the night will be given to the League of Friends for Johnson Community Hospital and the Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust Charitable Fund.
Tickets cost £35 each and details of how to book, including an online booking form, can be found at www.johnsoncommunityhospitalball.com.
Simon F Temple, Chairman of the Johnson Community Hospital Ball Committee, said: "The ball has proved to be very successful over the last five years and we hope to continue the fun this year with our Best of British theme. The evening is in aid of two wonderful charities, whose invaluable support directly benefits patients, visitors and staff at the Johnson Community Hospital. We hope to see everyone there.
LCHS CELEBRATES INTERNATIONAL NURSES' DAY - MAY 12
 

Nurses across Lincolnshire will be celebrating their honoured profession for International Nurses' Day next week. 
Staff from community teams and hospitals at Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will be taking part in a number of activities on Monday, May 12, to mark their dedicated careers. Visitors to John Coupland Hospital in Gainsborough will be able to explore the hospital's nursing heritage through a series of old photographs, while children can learn about Florence Nightingale through a poem, wordsearches and pictures to colour in. At County Hospital, Louth, the nursing team on Carlton Ward will be taking a closer look at their length of service to the NHS, while those on Manby Ward will be showcasing uniforms past and present. At Skegness Hospital, the team will be hosting their very own nurses' bake off. Visitors will also be invited to stop by for a coffee and cake, and browse through a display of photographs of Skegness Hospital through the ages. Old photographs of Spalding's nursing history will be shared on Welland Ward at Johnson Community Hospital, and a display on the history of nursing will be in the Minor Injuries Unit and on television screens in the Outpatients department. Lisa Green, Deputy Chief Nurse at LCHS, said: "On behalf of everyone at LCHS, I would like to give thanks to all of the nursing staff in our services across Lincolnshire and Peterborough. Every day I continue to be humbled by the dedication they give to their patients, whether it's to the new born children having their first visit from a health visitor, through to those supporting families and individuals receiving end of life care."
STUB IT OUT FOR GOOD ON NO SMOKING DAY

Smokers in Lincolnshire are being urged to prepare for battle and give up cigarettes forever, starting today on No Smoking Day. There are around 10 million adults who smoke, that’s almost 17% of the population, but studies show around two thirds of smokers want to quit. This year’s No Smoking Day has a ‘V for Victory’ theme to inspire hundreds of thousands of smokers to win the fight against cigarettes.
The campaign will help smokers on the road to victory, providing information, support and encouragement to put together a personal battle plan so that they are in the best possible position to make a successful quit attempt on the day.
South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group is backing the big push by urging smokers to sign up for personal support offered by Lincolnshire’s PHOENIX Stop Smoking Service. PHOENIX offers all the tools and resources to make the process as manageable as possible. Call free on 0800 840 1533 or Text ‘QuitCompletely’ to 07786205128
Other support includes the Quitline telephone service provided by UK charity QUIT. To find out more, visit www.quit.org.uk.
Dr Miles Langdon, GP and Chair of NHS South Lincolnshire CCG said:
“No Smoking Day is a great opportunity for us to encourage and support smokers in Lincolnshire to quit alongside hundreds of thousands of other people across the UK. We know that quitting isn’t easy but we want to reassure smokers that support is available to them and that they can win the battle against cigarettes. This support is crucial to helping smokers on the road to victory and towards a healthier and wealthier smoke-free life.”
The annual campaign is run by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and encouraged one million smokers to make a quit attempt last year.
Dr Mike Knapton, Associate Medical Director at the BHF, said: “Our ‘V for Victory’ message is set to inspire smokers to win the battle against cigarettes even if they’ve already attempted to quit in the past.
“Quitting smoking is the single best thing people can do for their health and we want to arm smokers with information and support that will send them on the road to victory. We’re encouraging smokers to mark Wednesday 12 March in their diary to join hundreds of thousands of other quitters in attempting to stub out cigarettes for good.”
For more information and support to help you quit as well as an online forum where you can talk and get motivation
HEALTH LEADER'S WARNING ON HIGH SALT

Health chiefs have backed a campaign urging people to eat less salt.
There is strong evidence that high salt intake sparks high blood pressure – the main cause of strokes and a major cause of heart attacks and heart failure. In turn, heart attacks and heart failure are the world’s most common causes of death and illness.
Eating too much salt is also a factor in osteoporosis, stomach cancer, kidney disease and kidney stones, and it aggravates the symptoms of asthma, Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes. Almost everyone in the UK eats too much salt. The daily recommended amount is no more than six grams yet current average intake is 8.1g – with many people eating even more.
A three-gram reduction in average daily intake by adults would reduce annual deaths from cardiovascular disease by between 14,000 and 20,000, saving around £350m in healthcare costs. Reducing daily salt intake by five grams could avert one and a quarter million deaths from stroke each year and almost three million deaths from cardiovascular disease.

Dr Miles Langdon, GP and Chair of NHS South Lincolnshire CCG said:

“It is important for individuals to take personal responsibility for their long term health and highlighting steps that they can take to reduce their salt intake, including checking labels, identifying high salt ingredients and cooking more food at home.

Most people in the UK eat too much salt without even realising it. You could be eating too much because about 75% of the salt we already eat is in the food we buy such as bread, cereals and ready meals.”

For more information on ‘saying NO to salt’ visit NHS Choices www.nhs.uk

COMMUNITY NHS SERVICES RATED HIGHLY BY PATIENTS
 

An independent survey has asked more than 1,000 patients for their feedback on NHS community services in Lincolnshire.
The survey, commissioned by Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), found more than 90 per cent of these patients rated the services providing their care as excellent or good.
The patients surveyed had all used either community nursing, physiotherapy or podiatry services across the county.
They were asked whether they would recommend service to family and friends, how their health professional treated them, how helpful the information they received was, appointments and overall care.

The survey found:
91 per cent rated their overall experience as excellent or good;
88 per cent were extremely likely or likely to recommend services to family and friends if they needed more treatment;
97 per cent felt they were treated with dignity and respect;
85 per cent said they were involved as much as they wanted to be in decisions about their care and treatment;
89 per cent were happy with the frequency of appointments/visits.

Comments from patients included:
they treated me with the utmost respect and did the most brilliant job;
the district nurses were absolutely brilliant;
they were thoroughly professional and always on time, they had time for questions.

Lisa Green, Deputy Chief Nurse at LCHS, said: "This is the largest survey the trust has ever commissioned to look at what patients think of services and how they would like to see them improved. We were delighted with the responses, particularly for community nursing where 97 per cent of patients rated the services as either excellent or good.

"This survey is one of a number of ways we are gathering patient feedback to ensure we are offering the best possible services. As a result we will now be focussing on a number of areas, including helping patients to access services at short notice and working with clinical staff to make sure the information and advice they provide takes into consideration the needs of both the patient and their families."
24th January 2014

Give your views on Healthcare in Lincolnshire


The NHS in Lincolnshire is inviting anyone who has a story to tell about their healthcare to come along and share their experience on Tuesday 11 March from 10am-1pm at The Carre Arms in Sleaford, NG34 7JP.

Following the format of the previous Listening Event held in Spalding, the event will be attended by representatives from across the health and care community who will be on hand to listen to the experiences of patients, carers and their families.

The morning will include a welcome and opening presentation to explain an overview of the Keogh Review and format of the Listening Event, a listening section where the public will be joined by health and care representatives to share their experiences. A coffee break will follow and the event will finish with an informal session where attendees will have the opportunity to find out what each organisation does, within the health and care community.

Sharon Robson, Executive Nurse for South West Lincolnshire CCG said:
“By working closely with patients, family members and carers, our shared goal is to help shape the future of health and social care services in Lincolnshire.
We are encouraging the public to come along and share their personal experiences of the healthcare services they have received, these experiences will allow us to make sure that the services we provide across the county are safe and high quality for everyone”

Organisations attending the event include; representatives from the four Lincolnshire CCGs*, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust and Lincolnshire County Council, Chaplaincy and PALS.

Anyone who is interested to attend the event on 11th March 2014, at The Carre Arms, Mareham Lane, Sleaford, NG34 7JP is asked to register by emailing public.engagement@gemcsu.nhs.uk or calling 01522 515364.
* Lincolnshire West CCG
Lincolnshire East CCG
South Lincolnshire CCG
South West Lincolnshire CCG

20th January 2014
 
NHS Governing Body meeting in Market Deeping, 27 February 2014

NHS South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is the NHS body which plans and buys health services for people in and around South Holland and Welland.

The organisation will hold its next public meeting on Thursday 27 February 2014 at 1.30 pm at Eventus, Northfields Industrial Estate, Market Deeping, PE9 8FD.

Gary Thompson, Chief Officer for NHS South Lincolnshire CCG said: "It’s our vision for the 157,000 people of South Lincolnshire to live longer and healthier lives. Our Governing Body meets on a monthly basis and members of the public are welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."

Items on the agenda include, to consider the ULHT Patient Access Policy, to consider and note the finance report and to note the Infection Prevention and Control Report.

Meeting papers will be published www.southlincolnshireccg.nhs.uk

The next meeting will be held on Thursday, 27 March 2014 at 1.00 pm at Johnson Community Hospital, Spalding Road, Pinchbeck, Spalding, PE11 3BT
 

NHS TRUST BOARD MEETING - JANUARY 28
 
The first Board meeting of 2014 at Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will take place on Tuesday, January 28.
The monthly meeting will start at 1pm in the Royal Oak Boardroom at the trust's headquarters at Bridge House, The Point, Sleaford, NG34 8GG.

Items on the agenda this month include a patient story relating to the trust's lymphoedema service and updates on performance and finance.

Dr Don White, Chairman of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: "Our monthly Board meetings provide the public with an opportunity to find out more about the organisation, the services we provide and how well we are performing. The public are very welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."

LCHS runs services at four community hospitals in Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth, while specialist nurses and teams of therapists work to keep people out of hospital, or get them home sooner.
Infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams work in the community to keep children healthy.
GP out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre, Peterborough Minor Illness and Injury Unit, and five community practices provide primary healthcare to patients.
LCHS also has the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.

 
19th January 2014

CERVICAL CANCER AWARENESS WEEK

South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is working to prevent needless deaths by supporting Cervical Cancer Awareness Week, which runs from 19 to 25 January to raise awareness of the disease.
Nearly 3,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the UK, yet 20 per cent of women do not take up their invitation for cervical screening.
Dr Miles Langdon, South Lincolnshire CCG Chair, said:
“We are urging women who are invited for screening to take up their invitation. This is vital as early-stage cervical cancers don’t usually have symptoms and are generally detected through screening.”
However, there are some recognised symptoms associated with cervical cancer, these include
• Abnormal bleeding
• Post-menopausal bleeding
• Unusual discharge
• Discomfort or pain during sex
Dr Langdon added: “For Cervical Cancer Awareness Week 2014, we’re urging women who have experienced any of the symptoms to talk to their GP. It’s important that women talk about the changes in their body and ensure they seek medical attention if necessary.”
For younger women, there is now a vaccination against the persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection that causes changes to the cervical cells and is responsible for nearly all cervical cancers. The vaccine can help prevent 70 per cent of cervical cancers.
In older women, the most effective method of preventing cervical cancer is through the regular cervical screening which happens by invitation and which allows detection of any early changes of the cervix. Cervical cancer is largely preventable and, if caught early, survival rates are high.
31 December 2013

NEW YEAR OBE HONOUR FOR CANDICE
 
Bourne community nurse Candice Pellett has been named in the New Year Honours list.

Candice, a Senior Case Manager and Community Practice Educator for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), has been awarded an OBE.

The honour recognises her services to nursing, which not only sees her working full-time in Bourne, but also as a representative on a number of national panels and forums, such as the Prime Minister's Care and Quality Forum.

Candice started her career as a nursing auxiliary in 1989, and entered nursing training in 1992. She gained her district nursing specialist degree in 1999 and has held the Queen's Nurse title for the last six years.

Candice said: "I am humbled to be recognised for doing a job that I am very passionate about. I am also very proud to be able to represent community nursing nationally, and it is visiting patients every day around Bourne which gives me the knowledge and credibility to do so.

"Caring for my patients will always be my first priority and I am so proud of the people I work with. It always give me great pride when we can lead by example to our colleagues across the country."

Ellen Armistead, Chief Executive of LCHS, said: "We are delighted to hear of Candice's honour and offer our sincere congratulations to her. This achievement helps to reflect the dedication and care our nursing and therapy teams give to hundreds of patients every day in Lincolnshire, and in particular to the work of Candice and the whole team in Bourne."


The Queen's Nurse title recognises a commitment to high standards of patient care, learning and leadership, and is awarded by the Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI).

 
17 December 2013

DON'T LET FLU RUIN YOUR FESTIVE FUN

South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group is urging those most at risk from flu to protect themselves and their families as a matter of priority with a free flu jab. Full protection from the vaccine takes up to two weeks to develop and people should act now to get flu safe and make sure that flu doesn’t ruin their Christmas holiday.

Dr. Miles Langdon, South Lincolnshire CCG said: “Flu can knock even the healthiest people off their feet for a couple of weeks, but for some people it can be really serious - it can even be a killer.” 

Those at most risk include pregnant women, people living with a health condition such as severe asthma, chest or heart complaints, and those aged 65 and over.

In recent years, critical care units across the region have been busy with people who should have been vaccinated against flu, but instead ended up seriously ill over Christmas. Most of these patients would have been eligible for a free flu jab on the NHS. 

Dr. Langdon added: “The latest statistics show that worryingly only a small percentage have had the flu jab so far this winter, even though the vaccine has been widely available since the beginning of October.  I really want to emphasize how serious flu can be.  Not only can it stop you caring for your kids and keep you off work, but it can lead to more serious illness and a spell in hospital – and no one wants that over Christmas. Flu is a preventable illness and we really don’t want to see anyone getting seriously ill."

Contact your GP surgery now to arrange a convenient appointment and get your jab. It’s quick, safe and free for those most at risk from the virus.

For more information, speak to your GP or local pharmacist, or visit www.nhs.uk/flu

Flu vaccinations are currently offered free of charge to the following ‘at risk’ groups
  1. people aged 65 years or over (including those becoming age 65 years by 31 March 2014).
  2. all pregnant women (including those women who become pregnant during the flu season).
  3. children aged 2-3, who are eligible for a free nasal flu vaccination
  4. people with a serious medical condition such as:
    • chronic (long-term) respiratory disease, such as severe asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchitis
    • chronic heart disease, such as heart failure
    • chronic kidney disease at stage 3, 4 or 5
    • chronic liver disease
    • chronic neurological disease, such as Parkinson's disease or motor neurone disease
    • diabetes
    • a weakened immune system due to disease (such as HIV/AIDS) or treatment (such as cancer treatment)
  5. people living in long stay residential care homes or other long-stay care facilities where rapid spread is likely to follow introduction of infection and cause high morbidity and mortality. This does not include, for instance, prisons, young offender institutions, or university halls of residence
  6. people who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or those who are the main carer of an older or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill

5 December 2013

NHS TRUST - BOARD MEETING DECEMBER 17
 
The final Board meeting of 2013 for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will take place on Tuesday, December 17.

The meeting will take place at 1pm in the Royal Oak Boardroom at the trust's headquarters at Bridge House, The Point, Sleaford, NG34 8GG.

Dr Don White, Chairman of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: "Our monthly Board meetings provide the public with an opportunity to find out more about the organisation, the services we provide and how well we are performing. The public are very welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."

LCHS runs services at four community hospitals in Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth, while specialist nurses and teams of therapists work to keep people out of hospital, or get them home sooner.

Infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams work in the community to keep children healthy.

GP out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre, Peterborough Minor Illness and Injury Unit, and five community practices provide primary healthcare to patients.

LCHS also has the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.
26 November 2013

THINK YOU NEED ANTIBIOTICS?

Responsible use of antibiotics is the theme behind recent Antibiotics Awareness campaigns across Europe. We all know that antibiotics have revolutionised the way we treat infections but some bacteria is now building up a resistance making infection prevention a challenge and when we do need them, antibiotics less effective. 

Antibiotics will not treat viruses such as common colds, they simply don’t work. If you have a cold your immune system will help you recover.  There are many ways you can get help without seeing your GP. Talk to your pharmacist about taking paracetamol or an over-the-counter cold remedy or contact NHS 111 if you want to check you’re doing the right thing.  Resting, drinking fluids and washing your hands regularly with soap and water all help to reduce the spread of infection.  Only visit your GP when necessary and use antibiotics responsibly - your GP will be able to advise you whether antibiotics will help.

Have you ever been prescribed antibiotics and not finished the course? Many people have. If you stop taking your antibiotics part way through the course, even when you feel better, the antibiotics may have only killed some of the bacteria and you may become ill again.  You should always take antibiotics as prescribed and not share or save them. They’ve been prescribed for you only and your GP has considered the length of time you need to take them for.  Remember it is important that you finish the course.

Dr Miles Langdon, South Lincolnshire CCG: “We’re asking those that feel they might need antibiotics to visit their pharmacist first, a trained pharmacist will be able to advise on whether you need to visit your GP practice. 

“If you do see a GP and they advise against antibiotics it’s important that you accept their decision.  The antibiotics we have are all we have and we need to save them for when we really need them.  Frequent use of antibiotics builds up resistance and so makes it harder for us to really fight infections.  We are asking our patients to help us by using their local pharmacy or NHS 111 and not always expecting a prescription for antibiotics if they visit their GP.”
15 November 2013

NHS TRUST BOARD MEETING - NOVEMBER 26
 
The Board for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will meet on Tuesday, November 26, 2013.
The monthly meeting will take place at 1pm in the Royal Oak Boardroom at the trust's headquarters at Bridge House, The Point, Sleaford, NG34 8GG.
Dr Don White, Chairman of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: "Our monthly Board meetings provide the public with an opportunity to find out more about the organisation, the services we provide and how well we are performing. The public are very welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."
LCHS runs services at four community hospitals in Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth, while specialist nurses and teams of therapists work to keep people out of hospital, or get them home sooner.
Infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams work in the community to keep children healthy.
GP out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre, Peterborough Minor Illness and Injury Unit, and five community practices provide primary healthcare to patients.
LCHS also has the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.
 
28 October 2013

MISSED OUT ON STOPTOBER? IT'S NEVER TOO LATE TO QUIT
 
You may have missed out on the Stoptober challenge this year, but it's never too late to make your own quit pledge.
 
Since Stoptober began, more than 170 people in Lincolnshire signed up to complete the 28-day mass quit challenge with the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service.
 
But don't worry if you missed the October 1 start - specialist advisors from Phoenix, which is part of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), are still on-hand to help you quit all throughout the year.
 
Stephanie Heathcote, Smoking Cessation Lead at LCHS, said: "We're really proud of everyone who managed to keep on track with their quit this Stoptober but we appreciate not everyone might have been ready to take that step. When they do decide to stop, we have advisors all over Lincolnshire who can help tailor specific help and support around their daily routine and lifestyle.
 
"Since Phoenix started in 2001, we have supported more than 50,000 people to quit and it's never too late to join them."
 
The Phoenix Stop Smoking Service works closely with other healthcare professionals, including GPs and pharmacies, to ensure help is never too far away.
 
To find an advisor where you live, simply call the service on 0800 840 1533 or call in to any of the Phoenix Health Shops in Lincoln, Gainsborough or Skegness.
25 October 2013

NHS GOVERNING BODY MEETING IN MARKET DEEPING - 31 OCTOBER 2013

NHS South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is the NHS body which plans and buys health services for people in and around South Holland and Welland.

The  organisation will hold its next public meeting on Thursday, 31 October 2013 at 13.00 until 16:00 in the Hardwick Suite, Eventus, Northfields Industrial Estate, Market Deeping, PE6 8FD.

Gary Thompson, Chief Officer for NHS South Lincolnshire CCG said: "It’s our vision for the 157,000 people of South Lincolnshire to live longer and healthier lives. Our Governing Body meets on a monthly basis and members of the public are welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."
Items on the agenda include public health update, equality and diversity strategy, financial and performance updates.
Meeting papers will be published www.southlincolnshireccg.nhs.uk

The next meeting will be held on Thursday, 28 November 2013 at 13.00 in the Seminar Room, Johnson Community Hospital, Spalding PE11 3DT.
22 October 2013

SHAPE YOUR LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES ON THE HEALTH CHECKS BUS
 
Free health checks will be available to anyone visiting the NHS health bus, calling at a stop near you between 28 October and 1 November 2013.
People from Bourne, Holbeach, Market Deeping, Spalding and Stamford can have their blood pressure, diabetes risk and lung age checked by a health professional at one of the six stops.
In addition, there will also be the opportunity to get involved in developing local health services.
Dr Miles Langdon, Chair for NHS South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group said: “We are really keen to meet as many local people as possible during this week; carers and people from the community have a wealth of views and experience that can help shape the health services we buy in the future.  This is a real opportunity to get involved in your local health services and we are committed to delivering what’s right for our population.”
“The free health check only takes a few minutes and could help detect health issues you weren’t aware of. A health professional will discuss your results with you and make suggestions that could improve your health and change your life,” he added.

The health bus will be visiting a stop near you

Monday 28 October - 09:30-12:00
Godsey Lane, Market Deeping, Peterborough, Lincolnshire, PE6 8UD
 
Monday 28 October - 13:30-16:30
Exeter Street, Bourne, PE10 9NJ
 
Tuesday 29 October - 09:30 -16:30
Bakkavor, Spalding
West Marsh Road
PE11 2BB
 
Wednesday 30 October - 09:30 -16:30
Red Lion Square, Stamford, PE9 2AJ
 
Thursday 31 October - 09:30 -16:30
National Centre for Food Manufacturing, Park Road, Holbeach, PE12 7PT
 
Friday 01 November - 09:30 -16:30
Long Sutton Market House, 9 Market Street, Long Sutton
3 October 2013

INITIATIVE TO SUPPORT PREGNANT WOMEN QUIT SMOKING LAUNCHES IN BOSTON
 
An initiative offering extra support to help pregnant women quit smoking is being launched in Boston.
Healthcare organisations from across the county are joining forces to raise awareness of the dangers of smoking during pregnancy, and help signpost women - and their families - to support.
In Lincolnshire, almost 14 per cent of women are recorded as smoking at the time of delivery - a figure higher than the national average of 12 per cent.
Smoking throughout pregnancy increases the risks of miscarriage and can cause complications during pregnancy and childbirth.
The stop smoking initiative is being supported by Lincolnshire County Council, the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service, Smokefree Lincs Alliance, Boston Borough Council, Lincolnshire Fire and Rescue and midwifery services for United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust.
Phil Garner, Specialist Programme Manager for Public Health at the county council, said: "The issue of women smoking during pregnancy remains a concern. Women who quit are more likely to have a healthier pregnancy and a healthier baby, will reduce the risk of stillbirth and are less likely to experience morning sickness. We have brought health partners together to make it as simple as possible for women to access the support they need.
"This isn't just about quitting smoking, but about creating a safer, smoke-free home environment for the pregnancy and the early years of family life."
Stephanie Heathcote, Smoking Cessation Lead at Phoenix, which is part of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: "Reaching some mums remains a challenge but we have a strong partnership with the county's midwifery service, who now offer routine carbon monoxide screening and can put pregnant women in touch with our specialist advisors. Quitting isn't easy but we can make sure everyone has support which is right for them."
Hazel Harrison, Head of Midwifery at United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, said: "Maternity services are committed to informing women about the impact of smoking during pregnancy and supporting them to give up. We review this at every appointment, and have a good pathway through the Phoenix service to refer women for support. We follow NICE guidance and ensure all midwives are up-to-date by completing their mandatory training."
Contact the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service on 0800 840 1533 or text SMOKEFREE to 07786 205128.
For a safer, smoke-free home, contact Smokefree Homes on 01522 550542 or email smokefreehomes@lincolnshire.gov.uk
1 October 2013

HAPPY STOPTOBER!
 
Lincolnshire's smokers are being urged to make today the day they stub out their habit.
Stoptober - the nationwide 28-day mass quit attempt - starts today (October 1), and the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service is leading the way across the county.
Phoenix, which is part of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), works closely with pharmacies, GPs and other healthcare professionals to give the individual advice and support smokers need to quit.
Stephanie Heathcote, Smoking Cessation Lead at LCHS, said: "This is Stoptober's second year and we want Lincolnshire to be recognised for its residents' efforts to lead a healthier lifestyle. It's not just financial benefits you'll see if you take part, but lots of physical improvements including a better sense of smell and taste, and more energy.
"Phoenix is also launching a number of support groups across the county to coincide with the start of Stoptober, where you can meet other people and share your quit journey. Once you've completed your 28 days, you'll be four times more likely to succeed for good."
Smoking is one of the biggest causes of premature death and each year it accounts for more than 100,000 deaths in the UK. One in two long-term smokers will die prematurely from a smoking disease.
Those who take part in Stoptober will receive a preparation pack.
To sign up to Stoptober through Phoenix or to join one of the support groups, call in at one of the Phoenix Health Shops in Lincoln, Gainsborough and Skegness, or call the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service on 0800 840 1533 to find an advisor near you.
Alternatively, visit www.smokefree.nhs.uk/stoptober.
30 September 2013

NEW HEALTH SERVICE LAUNCHES IN PETERBOROUGH
 
Patients living in and around Peterborough will be able to use a new Minor Injuries and Illness Unit (MIIU) on Thorpe Road from Tuesday, October 1, 2013.
The service, which has been commissioned by Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), will offer a wider range of treatments and urgent care services such as stitching wounds, applying casts and taking x-rays. The MIIU will be based in the City Care Centre in Thorpe Road.
The unit will be open seven days a week from 8am to 8pm and led by staff with both nursing and medical backgrounds with enhanced skills, enabling them to see, treat and discharge patients independently. No appointment is necessary and the service aims to see and start patients' treatments within 45 minutes of their arrival.
The main aim of the MIIU is to help take the strain off the accident and emergency service, which is often used unnecessarily at a cost of £1.3million a year, therefore patients need to be encouraged to use the new MIIU service.
Cath Mitchell, Local Chief Officer Borderline and Peterborough Local Commissioning Groups (LCGs), said: "The new Minor Injury and Illness Unit (MIIU) is a significant development in our plans to improve and reshape GP and urgent care services in Peterborough. It will offer wider access to a range of treatments and facilities which will reduce the need for people to attend A&E with non-life threatening illnesses and injuries, alongside strengthening the current out of hours GP services in the city."
The MIIU will be run by Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), which has extensive experience of providing this kind of care through Minor Injuries Units in Spalding and Gainsborough, Urgent Care Centres in Louth and Skegness, and Lincoln's Walk-in Centre.
Liz Ball, General Manager for the South of LCHS, said: "We are very excited to be offering services to patients in Peterborough. We have been working hard over the last few months to ensure there will be a smooth transition from the Walk-in Centre to the Minor Injuries and Illness Unit.
"In the MIIU we can treat minor injuries and illnesses from strains and sprains, to broken bones, minor burns and bites. It is often unneccessary to make a trip to A&E when you can easily be treated here, with your local pharmacist or GP. We also aim to start a patients' treatment within 45 minutes of them arriving."
16 September 2013

NHS TRUST BOARD MEETING - SEPTEMBER 24
 
The Board for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will meet on Tuesday, September 24, 2013.
The monthly meeting will take place at 1pm in the Royal Oak Boardroom at the trust's headquarters at Bridge House, The Point, Sleaford, NG34 8GG.
Dr Don White, Chairman of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, said: "Our monthly Board meetings provide the public with an opportunity to find out more about the organisation, the services we provide and how well we are performing. The public are very welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."
Members of the public are also welcome to attend the trust's annual public meeting, which will be held the following week in Louth on September 30.
The meeting will run from 5pm to 7pm at the Brackenborough Hotel, on Cordeaux Corner, Louth, LN11 0SZ, and will review the trust's second year of operation.
LCHS runs services at four community hospitals in Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth, while specialist nurses and teams of therapists work to keep people out of hospital, or get them home sooner.
Infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams work in the community to keep children healthy.
GP out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre and five community practices provide primary healthcare to patients.
LCHS also has the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.
16 September 2013

DON'T DO IT ALONE THIS STOPTOBER
 
Trying to quit smoking on your own can be tough, so why not join one of the new support groups being set up across Lincolnshire?
The three new groups are being set up by the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service to coincide with the launch of Stoptober, a national 28-day quit challenge which starts on October 1.
The Phoenix Stop Smoking Service, which is part of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), offers free, non-judgemental support and advice on how to quit smoking.
The six group sessions, which will run fortnightly and be led by specialist Phoenix advisors, will also be a chance to meet other smokers who also share a determination to quit.
The first group sessions will be held at:
•             Gainsborough Health Shop, Market Place, Gainsborough - October 1 at 10am
•             Lincoln Health Shop, 21 Cornhill, Lincoln - October 3 at 10am
•             Skegness Health Shop, Lumley Road, Skegness - October 4 at 10am
Stephanie Heathcote, Smoking Cessation Lead at LCHS, said: "Having that extra encouragement or motivation to stay on track while you're trying to quit smoking can make all the difference. Everyone has their own reasons for wanting to stop smoking but those who join the groups will be able to share their tips about what works for them. You may even make a friend for life!"
To join one of the groups, call in to one of the Health Shops listed above or call the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service on 0800 840 1533.
For more information about the national Stoptober campaign, visit www.smokefree.nhs.uk/stoptober

9 September 2013

RISE TO THE STOPTOBER CHALLENGE WITH PHOENIX
 
The countdown has begun for Lincolnshire's smokers to kick the habit as part of Stoptober.
The 28-day national stop smoking challenge is returning once again on October 1 to give smokers as much - or as little - support they need to keep them on track while they quit.
Specialist advisors from the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service, which is part of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), are supporting the campaign.
Stephanie Heathcote, Smoking Cessation Lead at LCHS, said: "Giving up smoking can be a daunting task but by joining Stoptober those taking part can make sure they don't have to do it alone. By signing up through Phoenix, our advisors can make sure smokers can quit in a way which suits them best.
"The service works closely with other healthcare professionals, including GPs and pharmacies, to offer non-judgemental advice amd support. Those who achieve the 28-day Stoptober goal are five times more likely to stay smokefree."
To sign up to Stoptober, call in at Phoenix Health Shops in Lincoln, Gainsborough or Skegness, or call the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service on 0800 840 1533.
Participants will receive a Stoptober preparation pack and have access to a mobile phone app, text messaging service and encouragement from thousands of others taking part via social media.
Alternatively, gain support through the national Stoptober website www.smokefree.nhs.uk/stoptober


5 September 2013

SUMMER FETE CELEBRATIONS FOR HOSPITAL'S 100TH ANNIVERSARY
 
One of the last celebrations of the summer at Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will help mark John Coupland Hospital's centenary.
Friends and patients past and present are being invited to call in to reflect on 100 years of history at the summer fete in the hospital's grounds in Gainsborough on Saturday, September 21, from 10am-4pm.
The event will be opened by the Mayor of Gainsborough, Councillor Lesley Rollins, followed by a dedication ceremony of a centenary rose by the Rev Bill Williams.
Visitors can browse various craft stalls and try their luck on different games, or simply stop by for a refreshing drink and slice of cake.
Those feeling more adventurous might also like to try out the climbing wall.
The following day, supporters of the hospital are also invited to Evensong at All Saints Parish Church, which will be dedicated to John Coupland Hospital.
This is the second centenary this year for staff at LCHS. Two out of the four hospitals at the trust are commemorating 100th anniversaries - Skegness Hospital on May 19 and John Coupland on September 24. County Hospital in Louth is now in its 75th year, while the Johnson Community Hospital in Spalding has been open in its current location for four years.
Diane Kettleborough, who has been part of the organising committee for John Coupland Hospital's celebrations, said: "John Coupland Hospital is part of the community in Gainsborough and we are very proud to be helping to mark this historic anniversary.
"There will be something for everyone at the summer fete and we look forward to seeing everyone who comes to show their support."
All proceeds from the fete and a subsequent evening celebration at the Blues Club (Gainsborough Trinity) on September 28 will go to the John Coupland Charities Committee, which is an active supporter the hospital and its patients.


3 September 2013

NHS TRUST ANNUAL PUBLIC MEETING - SEPTEMBER 30
 
The NHS Trust responsible for providing community healthcare in Lincolnshire will hold its annual public meeting later this month.
The county's residents are being invited to attend and find out more about what Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) does at the meeting in Louth on September 30.
LCHS runs services at four community hospitals in Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth, while specialist nurses and teams of therapists work in the community across Lincolnshire.
Children and families are supported by infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams, and primary healthcare is available to patients of all ages by the GP out of hours services, Lincoln's walk-in centre and five community practices.
LCHS also runs the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment.
The annual public meeting will include an overview of the trust's second year in operation, as well as a question and answer session, where the community will have the opportunity to address trust directors.
Trust chairman Dr Don White said: "The past year has been extremely busy for the trust and this is a good opportunity to find out more about how we work with the community to provide a wide range of healthcare services.
"We also welcome the opportunity to meet our patients and service users to hear about their experiences, what they like and what they think we could do better for the next year ahead."
The meeting will run from 5pm to 7pm at The Brackenborough Hotel, on Cordeaux Corner, Louth, LN11 0SZ.
Light refreshments will be available.
Please confirm your attendance by contacting Maddy Wilson on 01529 220300 or maddy.wilson@lincs-chs.nhs.uk


26 July 2013

GREEN LIGHT FOR NHS SOUTH LINCOLNSHIRE CCG

NHS South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has been awarded full responsibility for planning and buying health services for people living in and around Stamford, Bourne, Spalding, Market Deeping, Holbeach and Long Sutton.
The CCG is one of four emerging NHS organisations in Lincolnshire that was assessed against 119 criteria as part of a rigorous scrutiny exercise known as authorisation.
In April 2013, NHS England was satisfied with 103 criteria and granted NHS South Lincolnshire CCG authorisation with 16 conditions. Since evidencing its ability to succeed as new commissioning organisation, all conditions have been lifted.
Dr Miles Langdon, Chair for NHS South Lincolnshire CCG said: “We are delighted to be recognised by NHS England for our performance and ability to invest in high quality health services for local people.
"Our CCG provided further evidence of strategic planning, arrangements for finance and governance and partnership working to achieve this.
"The 15 GP practices which make up our CCG will continue to work together to improve the health of people living in the area. It’s our vision for the people of South Lincolnshire to live longer and healthier lives. We will work to achieve this by working in partnership with local people and partner organisations to shape services around their needs.”


26 July 2013

QUEEN'S NURSE TITLE HONOUR FOR SPECIALIST NURSE
 
A specialist nurse who works with vulnerable children and young people and those in care of the local authority is the latest in Lincolnshire to be awarded the title of Queen's Nurse by the Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI).
Jenny Harper is the seventh nurse at Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) to have been successful in applying for the title, which reflects a commitment to high standards of patient care, learning and leadership.
The award recognises Jenny's excellence in leading a countywide team and the service to young people, particularly those who have been sexually exploited.
She said: "I am extremely proud to work with vulnerable children and young people. These individuals often feel powerless to influence their physical and emotional health and, due to circumstances beyond their control, have been separated from their birth family and moved into either foster care, residential care homes or secure accommodation.
"As a Queen's Nurse I hope to raise the profile of vulnerable children and young people in Lincolnshire, particularly those who have been sexually exploited. We must not shy away from the problems they face and instead recognise and address their health needs appropriately so they are on an equal footing with their peers in main stream services."
Jenny started her nursing career in 1989 as a state enrolled nurse in one of Lincolnshire's district hospitals. She went on to work in school nursing and as a specialist community public health practitioner in health visiting before joining the Vulnerable Children and Young People team in 2009.
Sue Cousland, Chief Nurse and Director of Operations at LCHS, said: "We are very proud of Jenny's hard work and achievement and would like to offer her our congratulations. The Queen's Nurses at Lincolnshire Community Health Services are making vital contributions to improving the quality of services both locally and nationally."
QNI Director Crystal Oldman said: "Congratulations are due to Jenny for her success. Community nurses operate in an ever more challenging world and our role is to support them as effectively as we can. The QN title is a key part of this and we would encourage other community nurses to apply."


11 July 2013

BUMPS AND BEYOND EXPANDS TO BOSTON
 
Specialist midwives supporting pregnant women to lead a healthier lifestyle are now running clinics in Boston.
Bumps and Beyond provides information and advice to women with a BMI of 35 and above who are due to have their babies at either Pilgrim or Lincoln County hospitals.
Since April 2012, the service has seen more than 450 women in Lincoln with the aim of avoiding excessive weight gain in pregnancy while lowering the risk of complications such as raised blood pressure, gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and the chances of having a caesarean section. 
Bumps and Beyond is run by Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), with healthy lifestyle midwives seeing women over a series of one-to-one antenatal appointments and one postnatal appointment.
Ailsa Millen, Healthy Lifestyles Midwife for LCHS, said: "Bumps and Beyond covers a range of different topics which contribute to a healthier lifestyle including basic nutrition, portion size, tips for healthy shopping, learning to read food labels and ideas for meals and snacks. While a healthier lifestyle promotes weight management, this is not a weight loss programme and we do not recommend dieting in pregnancy.
"The service has been very well received in Lincoln, with 87 per cent of the women we have seen achieving the optimal weight gain or less. We already have a number of women undertaking the programme in Boston and we hope to continue our success."
Anyone interested in taking part in the programme at either Boston or Lincoln should speak to their midwife or contact the Bumps and Beyond service on 01522 574173.


6 July 2013

NHS Trust appoints new Non-Executive Director
 
The NHS Trust Development Authority (NHS TDA) has today confirmed the appointment of Murray Macdonald as Non-Executive Director of Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS).
Mr Macdonald brings experience from both the public and private sector.
He is an experienced Non-Executive Director, with posts also held with Lincolnshire Community Voluntary Service and Speedwell Homes.
Currently, Mr Macdonald is Chief Executive of Boston Mayflower Housing Association, where he is responsible for all operational aspects of the company.
Dr Donald White, Chairman of LCHS, said: “I am pleased to welcome Murray to the organisation and I speak on behalf of the other Board members when I say that I am looking forward to working with him.
“Murray’s experience and knowledge will be an asset to our organisation as we continue to work towards achieving Foundation Trust status.”
Non-executive appointments to NHS Trusts made by the NHS TDA are subject to the Code of Practice of the Commissioner for Public Appointments. 
Mr Macdonald has been appointed from June 6, 2013, until June 5, 2017, and is entitled to receive a remuneration of £6,157 per annum.


4 July 2013

BABY CAFÉ CELEBRATES SECOND ANNIVERSARY
 
Mums and babies from across the Market Rasen area have been helping to celebrate The Wold's Baby Café's second birthday.
While the NHS is preparing to celebrate its 65th anniversary, visitors to the Baby Café had their own celebration and a slice of cake as the group marked its second year at Market Rasen Children's Centre in Kilnwell Road.
Almost 140 families have joined in sessions since the Baby Café was launched to give help and support from both skilled health professionals and other mums in a friendly café-style environment.
The free drop-in sessions are run by the local health visiting team from Lincolnshire Community Health Service NHS Trust (LCHS), in partnership with Lincolnshire County Council.
Liz Hillman, Health Visiting Development Lead for LCHS, was behind the Baby Café launch two years ago.
She said: "We had a wonderful time celebrating the Baby Café's second birthday. It's lovely to see the sessions are still going from strength-to-strength and feedback from families who visit has been very positive.
"Baby Cafés are a national initiative which are recognised as offering the gold standard in breastfeeding support to mums. We have a health visitor at every group session and we can hire out items such as baby slings, and give parents access to a library of books and resources.
"Pregnant mums are also welcome to attend. It's a great way to meet other people."
One mother at the group said: "Being a mother in this rural area is very isolating. The networking here is amazing."
Another added: "The Baby Café is a great reason to get out of the house. It's welcoming and you can get support in an informal way."
The Wolds Baby Café meets weekly at Market Rasen Children's Centre, Kilnwell Road, LN8 3BJ, on Thursdays from 10-11.30am.


28 June 2013

NHS TRUST JOINS NATIONAL PROGRAMME TO IMPROVE SERVICES FOR GAY PEOPLE
 
Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will now benefit from expertise and advice on improving health services for the lesbian, gay and bisexual community.
The trust has successfully joined Stonewall, the gay equality charity, to take part in its Health Champions Programme.
The programme, funded by the Department of Health, supports health organisations across Britain to improve health services for lesbian, gay and bisexual people.
Stonewall research shows that gay people have a range of specific health concerns which often go unmet.  Health services often overlook these needs and focus on sexual health.
LCHS joins 19 other health service organisations working with Stonewall across the country to tackle this in Lincolnshire.
Kirby Hussain, Equality and Human Rights Lead for LCHS, said: "We are committed to providing the highest quality of services and working with our community to do so. Our partnership with Stonewall and our role as a Health Champion will support us in delivering this commitment with and for our lesbian, gay and bisexual service users and staff."
James Taylor, Stonewall Senior Health Officer, said: "By being part of the Health Champions Programme, LCHS will receive free support from Stonewall to achieve real improvements in the care provided to lesbian, gay and bisexual people and their families."
LCHS is Lincolnshire's largest provider of community healthcare services.  It runs services at four community hospitals in Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth, while specialist nurses and teams of therapists work to keep people out of hospital, or get them home sooner.
GP out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre and five community practices provide primary healthcare to patients.
LCHS also has the Phoenix Stop Smoking Service, family and health lifestyle services and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.


27 June 2013

VOLUNTEERS TAKING 15 STEPS TO IMPROVE HEALTH SERVICES
 
Looking at wards and clinics through a patient's eyes is helping to improve community healthcare services in Lincolnshire.
Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) is using the 15 Steps Challenge to capture first impressions of service areas with the help of volunteer members of the trust.
The challenge, which is part of a national scheme, sees teams of four or five people people, including patient representatives, clinical and non-clinical staff and non-executive directors visiting different locations to recognise positive ideas and make recommendations on how improvements can be made.
The project was inspired by a parent who said she can tell what kind of care her daughter will receive within 15 steps of walking to to a ward.
Audrey Pestell is a 15 Steps volunteer member who has completed visits at County Hospital, Louth, and Skegness Hospital. She said: "I have been involved in many kinds of health inspections in the past but this is the first time it has been with the sole intention of improving the patient experience.
"If the practice provides evidence of a first class experience, it is important that this is noted and reported back. However, if there are pointers that there is something that could be improved, either with equipment, information provided or anything that reflects on patient wellbeing this is also reported back in a constructive manner.
"The 15 Step Challenge can certainly only improve the hospital experience for both patients and staff and give the NHS a hospital of which to be proud."
Improvements to community healthcare services in Lincolnshire as a result of the 15 Steps Challenge have included a review of information provided for patients and their relatives, the redecoration of a children's waiting area and supply of new toys to make it more appealing, and clearer signage for services.  
Keith Rossington, Clinical Governance Manager for the north east of the county at LCHS, said: "The views of our patients, their carers and families are very important to us, and this is a way they, as members of our trust, can make a real difference to the quality of the services we provide.
"We have already made a number of improvements to make our patients' experience better through the 15 Steps Challenge and further visits to other locations across Lincolnshire have been arranged."
Anyone interested in becoming a member of Lincolnshire Community Health Services can fill in an application form online at www.lincolnshirecommunityhealthservices.nhs.uk
Those interested in participating in the 15 Steps Challenge programme can also contact the Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) on 0845 602 438


17 June 2013

ROYAL THANK YOU FOR COMMUNITY MATRON
 
A community hospital matron has had a very special thank you for her kindness and dedication to the variety of services she has supported over her career.
Louise Johnson, a Matron for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS), spent an afternoon at the Queen's garden party after being nominated to attend by her colleagues.
Louise said: "I was very proud when I was nominated to attend the garden party at Buckingham Palace, as to me I am just doing my job which I absolutely love. Being a Matron gives me the opportunity to ensure high quality services are provided to our local population and the care is the best it can possibly be."
Louise has been a registered nurse for 15 years and now oversees the inpatient ward, Minor Injuries Unit and Outpatients department at Spalding's Johnson Community Hospital, and also the Independent Living Team, specialist nursing and community nursing in South Holland. She has previously worked in Lincolnshire's acute hospitals and in the community. Louise attended the event with her mum, Valerie Brocklehurst.
On arrival at Buckingham Palace, the pair were taken to the gardens where they had a chance to take in their impressive surroundings. After having the famous afternoon tea, they lined up to meet the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh, the Prince of Wales, Duchess of Cornwall and Duchess of Cambridge.
"The Queen has a really nice smile and she looked lovely," said Louise. "She seemed really interested in everyone and seemed so happy to be there. Camilla shook my hand and said hello, which was lovely. It was also nice to see Kate as she is carrying our future monarch."
Louise and Valerie also had the opportunity to meet many of the other guests at the event, which included athletes from the Olympic Games and members of the Armed Forces and police service.
Louise added: "I am proud to be a nurse and work in the community - it was a very humbling experience to be nominated. It was a really nice event and a once in a lifetime opportunity that I will never, ever forget."