NHS Lincolnshire is responsible for improving health and health services for the people of Lincolnshire.
"NHS Lincolnshire is at the heart of your local NHS.
We are responsible for commissioning (planning and buying) healthcare for approximately 740,000 people
across Lincolnshire."

NHS TRUST BOARD MEETING - MAY 26
 

The next Board meeting for Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust (LCHS) will take place on Tuesday, May 26.
The monthly meeting will start at 1pm in the Royal Oak Boardroom at the trust's headquarters at Bridge House, The Point, Sleaford, NG34 8GG.
Items due to be discussed this month include:
LCHS's Foundation Trust application;
annual accounts;
annual governance statement.
LCHS Chair Elaine Baylis said: "Our monthly Board meetings provide the public with an opportunity to find out more about the organisation, how well we are performing and the services we provide. The public are very welcome to attend and listen to the discussions."
LCHS runs services across the whole of Lincolnshire with district nurses, specialist nurses and teams of therapists working to keep people out of hospital or get them home sooner.
Four community hospitals provide services in the heart of Spalding, Skegness, Gainsborough and Louth.
Infant feeding co-ordinators, health visitors and school nursing teams work in the community to keep children healthy.
Out of hours services, Lincoln's Walk In Centre, and Peterborough Minor Illness and Injury Unit provide primary healthcare to patients.
LCHS also has the Phoenix NHS Stop Smoking Service and sexual health services to provide advice, information and treatment to improve people's health.


 

Not sure if it's an emergency? Call 111

With winter upon us and seasonal illnesses like flu and tummy bugs are circulating, pressure on the NHS increases. Help is at hand for people to understand the importance of accessing the right services first time.

If you’re generally fit and healthy, you may be unsure what to do or where to go with unexpected or urgent healthcare needs. In most instances people don’t need A&E or 999, and accessing more suitable healthcare could result in being seen quicker.

You should call NHS 111 if:

            •           you need medical help fast, but it is not a 999 emergency;
            •           you think you need to go to A&E or another NHS urgent care service;
            •           you don’t know who to call for medical help or you don’t have a GP to call; or
            •           you require health information or reassurance about what to do next.

For less urgent health needs you should still contact your GP or local pharmacist in the usual way.

NHS111 makes it easy for you to access healthcare advice when you need medical help fast, but it’s not a life-threatening situation.

Dr Kevin Hill, Chair of NHS South Lincolnshire CCG, said: 

“NHS111 is a free number, which is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  The highly trained call handlers can provide health advice, put you in touch with the right service, arrange to have you seen by a doctor or call you an ambulance.  The service is manned by trained call handlers with nurses on site to offer support if needed. Callers’ symptoms are assessed and they are given the healthcare advice they need or are directed immediately to the right service, first time.”

Those with internet access can also visit: http://www.nhs.uk/111